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Maine Audubon Road Crossing Structure Monitoring

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Project Date: 
Friday, November 21, 2014
Project Status: 

Wildlife need to cross roads safely to find food, water, breed and disperse to new areas. With changing habitats due to a changing climate, successful wildlife movement is even more important to species survival and adaptations to the changes.
In 2014, Maine Audubon and partners from the Maine Department of Fisheries & Wildlife, Maine Department of Transportation, and the Nature Conservancy piloted a survey of road crossing structures to assess whether they could be retrofitted for terrestrial wildlife movement. The project tested the use of the Passage Assessment System, or PAS, developed for the Washington State Department of Transportation.
This camera monitoring project's goal is to determine if wildlife are using different road crossing structures to move safely across roads (even without fencing to direct them to the structures). And if so, what species are using which types of road crossing structures, such as plastic culverts, concrete boxes, and bridges.
Go to maineaudubon.org/publications-resources/ and look under Wildlife Pathways to view a report with results of the camera study.

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Observation Summary

This is a summary of animal observation across all locations and positions.

Animal Image Count Animal Count
1 Wood Duck 1 1
2 Common Merganser 1 2
3 Common Porcupine 1 1
4 Eastern Phoebe 1 1
5 Common Grackle 1 1
6 American Beaver 1 1
7 Blue Jay 2 2
8 Snowshoe Hare 3 3
9 American Crow 6 6
10 American Robin 6 6
11 Eastern Chipmunk 7 7
12 Eastern Gray Squirrel 7 7
13 Coyote 10 10
14 Wild Turkey 18 30
15 Ermine 21 21
16 Red Squirrel 26 26
17 White-tailed Deer 31 31
18 Great Blue Heron 33 33
19 Moose 49 55
20 Red Fox 50 50
21 American Mink 53 53
22 Raccoon 191 239